S T U D I O  3 0 0  D i g i t a l  A r t  a n d  M u s i c  F e s t i v a l

O c t o b e r  5  &  6 ,  2 0 1 7

L e x i n g t o n ,  K e n t u c k y  U S A

 

Artists and Works

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All Exhibits, Presentations, & Concerts are Free and Open to the Public

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Composer Micheal Pounds demonstrates  interactive music systems for performance and composition that he developed with Arduino

microcontrollers and computers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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  9 a.m. - 7:30 p.m. —  "BYTE Gallery International Exhibition of Digital Art and Music" by various artists   — In Rafskeller Foyer    Thurs. & Fri. Oct. 5-6.                                                                                                                                  Mitchell Fine Arts Center (MFA)

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"A Prayer For Our Earth: Pine Mountain" by Timothy Polashek               Electro-Acoustic Music and Digitally Controlled Lights

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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 "Fzzl for Solo Snare Drum and Live Electronics" by Dan VanHassel                                        Interactive Music for Snare Drum

                                                                                            Jonathan Sharp, Percussion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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"Flow" by Micheal Pounds                                                                                                       Interactive Music for Proximity Sensors

                    Micheal Pounds, Proximity Sensors

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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"Harvest Kitchen 2B" by Christopher Bailey                                                                       Electro-Acoustic Surround Sound Music

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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"Frayed Cities" by Phillip Sink                                                                                                 Electro-Acoustic Surround Videomusic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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"Becoming" by Drew Raleigh                                                                                               Interactive Videomusic for Electric Guitar

                           Drew Raleigh, Electric Guitar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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"AWal" by Andrew Walters                                                                                                                                    Live Electronic Music

                     Andrew Walters, Modular Synthesizers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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  "B Slide Rift" by Griffin Cobb                                                                                                                              Live Electronic Music

                                 Griffin Cobb, Electric Guitar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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  "Go Vampire Go" by Transylvania Interactive Technology Ensemble (TITE)                              Interactive Music and Multimedia

                                      Timothy Baker, Emily Dent, Meredith Moir, Timothy Polashek,

                                      Sarah Ripplinger, Megan Schandel, Jenna Soderling,

                                      Brendan Thompson, Brandon Trapp, & Zach Yacobozzi

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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 "Night Vision" by Jack Carter                                                                                                                                                Electronica

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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"Max does Tai Chi 24" by Larry Barnes                                                                                                    Interactive Music and Tai Chi

                                              Larry Barnes, Tai Chi and Motion Sensors

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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"from Australia" by Mara Helmuth                                                                                            Interactive Music for Laptop Ensemble

                                 Cincinnati Composers Laptop Orchestra Project (CiCLOP)

                                 Nicolas Bizub, Mara Helmuth, Michael Lukaszuk, and Zhixin Xu

 

from Australia is a multichannel laptop ensemble piece, inspired by and based on samples recorded in 2016 at the stunning Great

Barrier Reef, Daintree Rainforest, and Uluru in the Outback desert. Laptopists perform a structured improvisation with sound selection

and processing techniques.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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"Reveal" by Diogo Carvalho                                                                                                             Electro-Acoustic Music for Guitar

                       Diogo Carvalho, Guitar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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"Afterimage 4" by Ronald Keith Parks                                                                                                       Interactive Music for Piano

                                  Tomoko Deguchi, Piano

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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"Things that Go Bump in the Night" by Emily Nance                                                                                       Electro-Acoustic Music

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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"Topos" by Kyle Shaw                                                                                                              Electro-Acoustic Music for Vibraphone

                       Victor Pons, Percussion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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"Der Brunnen (The Well)" by Maurice Wright                                                                      Electro-Acoustic Surround Videomusic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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  "tempora mutantur" by Chin Ting Chan                                                                                                 Interactive Music for Clarinet

                                           Andrea Cheeseman, Clarinet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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  For more information, contact Dr. Timothy Polashek, director of the STUDIO 300 Festival

  Transylvania University, 300 North Broadway, Lexington, KY 40508 USA

 

  http://www.facebook.com/studio300festival

  http://www.transy.edu/music/STUDIO_300/

  9:30 - 10:45 a.m. — Artist's Talk 1: "Gesture and Interface: Alternatives for Control in Computer    — In Faculty/Staff Lounge

   Thurs. Oct 5.           Music Performance" Demonstration by composer Michael Pounds                     Mitchell Fine Arts Center (MFA)

  1:30 - 2:45 p.m. — Artist's Talk 2: "Virtual Realities" performance in the Morlan Gallery                   — In Morlan Gallery

    Thurs. Oct 5.        by artists Dima Strakovsky and Richie Hoagland                                                     Mitchell Fine Arts Center (MFA)

  2:45 - 3:00 p.m.— Reception for Studio 300 Musicians and Artists                                                        — In Morlan Gallery

    Thurs. Oct 5.       Transylvania students, faculty, & public are invited (snacks & drinks provided!)  Mitchell Fine Arts Center (MFA)

  3:00 - 4:00 p.m. —  Open Discussion: "Philosophical implications of virtual reality"                        — In Morlan Gallery

    Thurs. Oct 5.         (reception continues -snacks and drinks provided!)                                              Mitchell Fine Arts Center (MFA)

  9 a.m. - 7:30 p.m.           — Exhibit: Senses of Place: VR "Virtual Realities" by Dima Strakovsky & Richie Hoaglan

    Thurs. & Fri. Oct. 5-6.   — Exhibit:  Senses of Place: VR "Dreams" by HVREdev                                — In Morlan Gallery

                                                                                                                                                                         Mitchell Fine Arts Center (MFA)

  9 a.m. - 7:30 p.m.           — Exhibit: "attackSUSTAINrelease" installation by Ted Moore                      — In Coleman

    Thurs. & Fri. Oct. 5-6.                                                                                                                                  Mitchell Fine Arts Center (MFA)

  7:30 - 9:00 p.m. — WAVE 1 Concert: featuring surround sound, electro-acoustic                                       — In Haggin Auditorium

   Thurs. Oct 5.         performance, digitally controlled lights, interactive music, and videomusic         Mitchell Fine Arts Center (MFA)

Timothy Polashek produces works in a variety of media and styles, including vocal, instrumental, electro-acoustic, multimedia, and text/sound music and poetry, as well as music for interactive performance systems and sound installations, which are performed throughout the world. Passionate about developing new sounds and new musical ideas, he designs computer programs to build innovative digital instruments and synthesizers. His music can be heard on the compact disks “Wood and Wire,” released by Albany Records, and Electric Music Collective albums “Incandescence” and “Defiant.” His research projects in audio synthesis and text/sound music are published in the Journal of the Society of Electro-Acoustic Music in the United States and the Leonardo Music Journal, published by MIT Press. He is the author of The Word Rhythm Dictionary: A Resource for Writers, Rappers, Poets, and Lyricists. Prior to earning the Doctor of Musical Arts in Composition degree from Columbia University, Polashek earned the M.A. in Electro-Acoustic Music from Dartmouth College, and a B.A. in with Honors in Music from Grinnell College. He is the Music Technology Studies Coordinator, Digital Arts and Media Program Director, and Associate Professor of Music at Transylvania University.

Written in 2011 for percussionist Joseph VanHassel, Fzzl is a contemporary snare drum solo that fuses the acoustic and electronic through the use of a small transducer attached to the bottom of the snare drum. This allows electronic sounds produced by the computer via MAX software to resonate through the drum rather than separate speakers. Using a contact microphone attached to the top, the drum is used to trigger and interact with all sorts of electronic modifications and extensions of its sound. The piece was written while Dan VanHassel was studying West African dance-drumming which inevitably found its way into the piece, along with a healthy dose of electronica and hip-hop.

0Michael Pounds began his career as a mechanical engineer, but returned to school to study music composition with a focus on computer music. He studied at Bowling Green State University, Ball State University, the University of Birmingham in England, and the University of Illinois. He specializes in computer music composition and collaborative intermedia projects. His awards include the ASCAP/SEAMUS Student Commission Award, a Residence Prize at the Bourges International Electroacoustic Music Competition, a Rotary Foundation Ambassadorial Scholarship for studies in England, and residencies at the MacDowell Colony and I-Park. He was a co-host of the 2005 SEAMUS national conference, as well as the 2014 SCI national conference. Michael is a faculty member at Ball State University.

"Virtual Realities," by Dima Strakovsky and Richie Hoagland, is at once a performance, an installation and a product demo. It explores the transformation of parent/child relationship brought about by the changes in contemporary technologies.  Parent and child performers will play together using smart phone technology, virtual reality, and wireless networks. Gallery visitors participate as audience for the 15-minute performance (three 5-minutes scenarios) which is then followed by a 30-minute open discussion of the project and time for the audience to experience the artwork.

Dmitry "Dima" Strakovsky was born in St. Petersburg, Russia in 1976. He has lived in the United States since 1988. Dima completed his MFA degree at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago's Department of Art and Technology and stayed in Chicago for several years producing art and working for various companies in the toy invention industry. He has been able to parlay this experience into a series of classes that deal with electro-mechanical fabrication and software development in the arts. Dima's work spans diverse media and conceptual interests. Collaborative performances, media installations, drawing and sculptural works are just some of the examples of different modalities that define his output. His work has been included in a variety of exhibitions and events at venues such as Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music, Moscow Biennale, Mediations Biennale (Poznan) and Indianapolis Museum of Contemporary Art.

At the pace of one taking deep breaths, brown noise swells in and out of each suspended raw speaker cone in an unpredictable pattern. With it, the water in the cones agitate and reflect light into shimmering patterns on the walls and ceiling. The minimalist presentation draws a strong causal relationship between all of the elements in the room: sound, water, light, and the physical functionality of speakers. The simplicity of the relationships is intended to push the observer beyond any technical wonder and relate to the piece on an intuitive and emotional level. "attackSUSTAINrelease" was developed at a Sound Art Installation Workshop at the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) at Stanford University in the Summer of 2012. (speaker drivers, water, light, and brown noise)

Ted Moore is a composer, sound designer, and music educator living in Minneapolis. His work has been reviewed as “an impressive achievement both artistically and technically” (Jay Gabler, VitaMN), “wonderfully creepy” (Matthew Everett, TC Daily Planet), and “epic” (Rob Hubbard, Pioneer Press). Ted’s work focuses on live electronic processing with live performers using the digital signal processing programming language SuperCollider. He has also been featured as a sound installation artist by the St. Paul Public Library, TC Make, and notably at the 2014 Northern Spark Festival in Minneapolis. He is one half of Binary Canary, a woodwinds-laptop improvisation duo.

The BYTE GALLERY is an interactive kiosk exhibiting digital art, music, and video works by artists, dramatists, musicians, and other multimedia artists from around the world, as well as works by Transylvania University students and faculty.

A Prayer For Our Earth: Pine Mountain is a work (a multimedia sound/light installation) designed for the November 20th, 2015 Gallery Hop at Christ Church Cathedral in Lexington, Kentucky. The work is my setting of Pope Francis’ “Prayer for Our Earth” intended as artistic prayer for Pine Mountain, which is an important natural and ecological resource along the border of Kentucky. I learned about how precious and vulnerable Pine Mountain is during a residency for artists sponsored by the Kentucky Natural Lands Trust (KNLT). Many of the sounds heard in this piece were recorded on top of Pine Mountain and at the Pine Mountain Settlement School.

Richard Hoagland uses digital game development, hardware reappropriation, emerging technology, and play to create interactive systems. Richard’s work has been exhibited at events such as IndieCade, ALT.CTRL.GDC, FILE, and Smithsonian Indie Arcade. He lives in Kentucky most of the year.

Two virtual reality (VR) artworks allow visitors to experience different approaches to this new art form. "Dreams" offers a virtual gallery of 10 other-worldly places developed by HVREdev, a collective of individuals and small teams. To experience this self-guide dream tour, participants will need their own Android smartphone. "Virtual Realities," by Dima Strakovsky and Richie Hoagland, is at once a performance, an installation and a product demo. It explores the transformation of parent/child relationship brought about by the changes in contemporary technologies.  Parent and child performers will play together using smart phone technology, virtual reality, and wireless networks. Gallery visitors participate as audience for the 15-minute performance (three 5-minutes scenarios) which is then followed by a 30-minute open discussion of the project and time for the audience to experience the artwork. Please visit our website for “Virtual Realities” performance dates and times.

Dr. Jonathan Sharp is a highly regarded percussion artist and educator with an diverse teaching and performance background. He is currently Assistant Professor of Percussion at Iowa State University and has held previous appointments at Morehead State University and Centre College. Dr. Sharp has performed concerts throughout the United States, Europe and Asia, as a soloist and classical musician. His performing credits include the Lexington Philharmonic Orchestra, the Champaign- Urbana Symphony Orchestra, the Boston Pops Orchestra, and the Sinfonia Da Camera among many others. He frequently presents recitals, workshops, and clinics on topics specializing in electro- acoustic percussion, multiple percussion, and contemporary concert snare drum. Dr. Sharp holds degrees from the University of Kentucky, University of Illinois, and Morehead State University.

“Flow” is a piece for one performer using an Arduino-based computer interface with nine infrared proximity sensors. The piece is performed entirely by moving one’s hands over these sensors, and not physically touching anything. Each sensor activates a different recording of water sounds, which were collected during travel in Japan. The height of the hand above each sensor controls some aspect of the signal processing of each sound. The title refers obviously to the water sounds, but also to the fluid motion of the hands during the performance. The title is also inspired by the psychological state in which a person is fully absorbed and focused in his or her activity.

Michael Pounds began his career as a mechanical engineer, but returned to school to study music composition with a focus on computer music. He studied at Bowling Green State University, Ball State University, the University of Birmingham in England, and the University of Illinois. He specializes in computer music composition and collaborative intermedia projects. His awards include the ASCAP/SEAMUS Student Commission Award, a Residence Prize at the Bourges International Electroacoustic Music Competition, a Rotary Foundation Ambassadorial Scholarship for studies in England, and residencies at the MacDowell Colony and I-Park. He was a co-host of the 2005 SEAMUS national conference, as well as the 2014 SCI national conference. Michael is a faculty member at Ball State University.

The title of the work refers to the Harvestworks media center in New York City; I am grateful for a residency there that enabled the realization of Part I this composition. It also refers obliquely to a messy ex-housemate of mine, in whose house many of the sounds in this work were recorded. The speakers are divided into 4 groups (pairs, in an octophonic setting) surrounding the listeners. Taking after Elliott Carter's acoustic poly-ensemble conceptions, each group is treated as a separate instrument or ensemble, with its own musical materials (rhythmic, source and processual). In this work I made use of a software application I built, called the "musique concrete

gesture engine." A composer enters data about sounds in a diverse concrete sound collection and then specifies musical gestures abstractly by creating parametric profiles called models. Models, realized as sequences of actual soundfiles via database queries, can be written out as mix-files which can then be displayed, modified, processed, and mixed with various audio processing and mixing tools.

Born outside of Philadelphia, Christopher Bailey turned to music composition in his late ‘teens, and to electroacoustic composition during his studies at the Eastman School of Music, and later at Columbia University. He is currently based in Boston, but frequently participates in musical events in New York City. His music explores a variety of musical threads, including microtonality, acousmatic and concrète sounds, serialist junk sculpture, ornate musical details laid out in flat forms, and constrained improvisation. Recent commissions include Empty Theatre, a piano concerto, commissioned for a portrait concert of his music as part of the Sinus Ton Festival in Magdeburg, Germany (October 2014). He was a 2nd-Prize recipient in the Seoul 2005 International Composers Competition in Korea. Sand (an interactive computer-music composition) won a mention at Denmark’s 2007 Infinite Composing interactive computer-music competition. Walking Down the Hillside at Cortona, and Seeing it’s Towers Rise Before Me (for 2 pianos tuned to 19-tone-equal-temperament) won a mention in the 2009 Salvatore Martirano Competition.

Photographers love urban decay. We see endless images of ruins from cities like Detroit, Flint, and Gary. Once-charming downtown

areas in many cities and towns have been boarded up and abandoned. Dying American towns and cities can either be the remnants of suburban flight, or the symptoms of a nation in decline. In Frayed Cities, I wanted to explore images and sounds from dying cities. Using the idea of city planning and blueprints of buildings as a springboard into the video, I developed sketch drawings of people and cities. Through animating these sketches, I attempted to create an abstract narrative that explores the fact that there are no plans in place to reverse urban blight or aid the people who may be stuck living in these areas. With this in mind, I composed the music with sounds derived from crowds, construction/destruction, closing/opening doors, and other sources.

Phillip is the recipient of many awards including a Post-doc of music composition at University of Missouri; Hermitage Prize given by the 2015 Aspen Music Festival; the Best Music Submission Award at the 2015 International Computer Music Festival; three Indiana University Dean’s Prizes for best orchestral, chamber, and electronic music. His electroacoustic music has been selected for presentation at conferences such as the ICMC and SEAMUS. He studied electronic music with Jeffrey Hass and John Gibson, and acoustic composition with Don Freund, Claude Baker, David Dzubay, Aaron Travers, Sven-David Sandström, Ricardo Lorenz, Jere Hutcheson, and Scott Meister. Currently, he is Assistant Professor of Music Theory and Composition at Northern Illinois University where he teaches music theory, aural skills, composition, and electronic music.

This multimedia piece was composed in Fall of 2015 while I was enrolled in Interactive Music and Multimedia at Transylvania University, which focused on developing skills with the Max programming language and interface. The video is constructed from old film footage from the early 20th Century that is now in the public domain. As I assembled the assorted clips, I inadvertently discovered a theme of industrial progress and its potential dystopian consequences. Audio and video are simultaneously manipulated with a MIDI pedalboard controller linked in a Max interface patch.

Drew Raleigh is a guitarist, composer, multimedia artist, and staff audio engineer at several music venues in Lexington, Kentucky. He graduated from Transylvania University with a Bachelor of Arts with Honors in Music Technology and Minors in Communications and Digital Arts and Media. He was born in Whitesburg, Kentucky, where his family encouraged his musical development from an early age.

AWal is an improvisation/stand alone set for Eurorack synthesizers and computer. Sounds will be created using a Moog Mother 32, Korg SEQ-1, Bubblesound VCOb, Make Noise Telharmonic, and Mutable Instruments Peaks among other modules. Processing and additional sounds are produced by Propellerhead’s Reason. Everything is done live with sequencers, LFO’s etc.

Andrew Walters was born in Topeka, Kansas but spent most of his beginning years in Farmington, Missouri. Walters has received degrees from Millikin University, Northern Illinois University, and a Doctor of Musical Arts degree in composition from the University of Illinois. Walters’ music has been performed at various conferences throughout the United States and Canada including SEAMUS, SCI, ICMC, Spark, Imagine II, Electronic Music Midwest, Electroacoustic Juke Joint. His piece “Before Clocks Cease Their Chiming” was premiered by Duo Montagnard at the 2009 World Saxophone Congress in Bangkok, Thailand. His music appears on volume nine and sixteen of the “Music from SEAMUS” compact discs. Currently he is Associate Professor of Music Theory and Music Technology at Mansfield University in Mansfield, Pennsylvania.

This piece is a study in electric guitar timbre; in order to achieve a unique sound, the signal is being heavily processed before being amplified. Through the use of effects, the guitar can be made to sound somewhat like an analog synthesizer generating a square wave, but with some added timbral quirks and “dirtiness.” While some of the effects are digital, there is no sampling or sequencing involved – all of the sound is created only by altering the guitar output signal.

Griffin Cobb is a senior at Transylvania majoring in music technology, computer science, and Spanish. He has musical experience and interest in a wide variety of roles and genres, usually centering around guitar, bass guitar, and vocals. After graduation, he hopes to return to his home city of Louisville and find work in one of his fields.

Transylvania University's Interactive Music and Multimedia class, taught by Timothy Polashek, take the stage as the Transylvania Interactive Technology Ensemble (TITE) to debut their latest digital light compositions and collaborative performance works.

Jack Carter is a Master's student at the University of Kentucky, specializing in linguistics. He graduated from Transylvania University in 2015 with double majors in Spanish and Music Technology with Honors, and he continues to compose electronic music alongside his schoolwork. A guiding philosophy for his music is the desire to blur the line between "art" and "pop," highlighting the distinction as intersubjective and arbitrary.

"Night Vision" is a three part musical collage that brings together disparate pieces in an attempt to synthesize greater meaning from their juxtaposition. The first movement, "Impression: Crépuscule (Impression: Twilight)," reflects that transient point in the day when the sun is setting and also references Monet's seminal painting that gave its name to Impressionism. "Aurora," the second movement, compares fleeting inspiration/artistry to the famous ionization of atmospheric constituents, resulting in brief, but brilliant, color displays. Finally, "La Dama del Alba (The Lady of the Dawn)" represents the inevitable "morning after" the night full of visions; the composer and listeners accept the inevitability of the sunrise, erasing the colorful array of ideas, but bringing with it new light. Together, these pieces convey the transitory nature of brilliance, but they also acknowledge that this does not render those perfect moments any less breathtaking.

  10:30 - 11:20 a.m. — Artist’s Talk 3: “Making Music with Modular Synthesizers"                               — In Faculty/Staff Lounge

     Fri. Oct 6.                Demonstration by composer Andrew Waters                                                        Mitchell Fine Arts Center (MFA)

  11:30 - 12:20 a.m. — Artist’s Talk 4: “from Australia - Sound Improvisation on Natural Environments"  — In Faculty/Staff Lounge

     Fri. Oct 6.                Presentation by composer Mara Helmuth                                                              Mitchell Fine Arts Center (MFA)

  12:30 - 1:20 p.m. — Artist’s Talk 5: “Made in a garage, stop-motion music video"                           — In Faculty/Staff Lounge

     Fri. Oct 6.              Music video screening precedes presentation by animator                                Mitchell Fine Arts Center (MFA)

                                   and music video producer Dave Abbott

   2:30 - 3:20 p.m. — Artist’s Talk 6: "Dreams" in high definition followed by discussion with artists  — In Faculty/Staff Lounge

     Fri. Oct 6.             by artist Shylo Shepherd and artist collective HVREdev                                      Mitchell Fine Arts Center (MFA)

Andrew Walters was born in Topeka, Kansas but spent most of his beginning years in Farmington, Missouri. Walters has received degrees from Millikin University, Northern Illinois University, and a Doctor of Musical Arts degree in composition from the University of Illinois. Walters’ music has been performed at various conferences throughout the United States and Canada including SEAMUS, SCI, ICMC, Spark, Imagine II, Electronic Music Midwest, Electroacoustic Juke Joint. His piece “Before Clocks Cease Their Chiming” was premiered by Duo Montagnard at the 2009 World Saxophone Congress in Bangkok, Thailand. His music appears on volume nine and sixteen of the “Music from SEAMUS” compact discs. Currently he is Associate Professor of Music Theory and Music Technology at Mansfield University in Mansfield, Pennsylvania.

Andrew Walters from Mansfield University in Pennsylvania will discuss and demonstrate the basics of Eurorack and Semi-Modular synthesizers. He will show different techniques for creating music on his own modular setup and discuss different approaches to modular synth performance.

Mara Helmuth will discuss creative work coming from her visit to the Great Barrier Reef, Daintree Rainforest and the Outback in Australia in 2016. The laptop ensemble piece “from Australia” is based on source sounds from snorkeling, walking in nature, and listening to birds and sounds of rushing streams or desert canyons. In this work she also applies granular synthesis techniques to form unique textures and sounds from natural sources.

Fast Asleep is a stop motion music video for Too Many Drummers’ song “Fast Asleep”. Dave originally conceived of the project while

attempting to design a band T-shirt. Frustrated by a lack of inspiration, he sketched a rectangle with arms, legs, and a smiling face…

unintentionally launching a concept that would consume the next 3 ½ years of his life. Although he had no prior experience in stop motion animation, Dave built a set in his garage, designed characters, and began experimenting with animation techniques. He composed and recorded all the music in the video (with the exception of a nod to Franz Schubert’s “Ave Maria”) in his home studio. The band lacked a bass player so when it came time to put faces in the robots Dave reached out to fans, friends, and family, inviting them to participate. 35 people (including 5 former TMD bandmembers) make an appearance as the bass player in the video. From start to finish, the project took over 3 ½ years to complete.

"Dreams" offers a virtual gallery of 10 other-worldly places developed by HVREdev, a collective of individuals and small teams.

Mara Helmuth composes music often involving the computer and her own software. Her music is performed internationally, and recordings include Sounding Out! (Everglade), Sound Collaborations (Centaur Records), Implements of Actuation (Electronic Music Foundation), and works on Open Space. She teaches composition at the College-Conservatory of Music, University of Cincinnati and directs the Center for Computer Music. She taught at Texas A&M University and New York University and was president of the International Computer Music Association. She holds a D.M.A. from Columbia University and degrees from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Her research has involved granular synthesis, Internet2, and RTcmix instruments.

Mara Helmuth composes music often involving the computer and her own software. Her music is performed internationally, and recordings include Sounding Out! (Everglade), Sound Collaborations (Centaur Records), Implements of Actuation (Electronic Music Foundation), and works on Open Space. She teaches composition at the College-Conservatory of Music, University of Cincinnati and directs the Center for Computer Music. She taught at Texas A&M University and New York University and was president of the International Computer Music Association. She holds a D.M.A. from Columbia University and degrees from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Her research has involved granular synthesis, Internet2, and RTcmix instruments.

Deconstructing an instrument is a revelation, because it unsettles the myth, causing a change in the listeners’ perception. The guitar is the source for all the sounds presented in this piece, which emphasizes the ones that have been hidden by the instrument’s technique and repertory, or unnoticed due to their low volume. Reveal is a noun and a verb, and the piece expresses both meanings, because it reveals the rich universe of resources denied by the traditional technique and provides a new possible listening to a guitar, when the

listener might achieve a whole new comprehension of the instrument—the piece brings to light a sub-known universe of sounds that was present, but not understood.

Diogo Carvalho, born in São Paulo, Brazil, is a composer, scholar, performer, and professor with experience in electroacoustic, concert, popular, jazz, and Brazilian music. He is currently a doctoral composition student at the University of Florida. Carvalho stands out with his ample knowledge and musicality. In "Concerto for Guitar and Orchestra" (2011), the composer explores Brazilian musical gestures in classical form. In the electroacoustic piece "Cave of the Harmonic Beats" (2014), Carvalho merges guitar sonorities with computer processing, using the metaphor of a bat moving in the dark while hearing its movements from sound reflections on the walls. "Clarinetism" (2015) consists of an experiment with the idiomatic characteristics of a solo clarinet, focusing on articulation and timbre.

Afterimage 4, written for pianist Tomoko Deguchi, is the fourth in a series of works for solo instrument and computer. In Afterimage 4 I was interested in exploring various ways that the computer processing could represent an acoustic shadow, or afterimage of the piano input. The electroacoustic portion of the composition is created in real time by applying a variety of processing to the piano input such as granular sampling, convolution, spectral accumulation and evaporation, and other more conventional methods.

Composer Ronald Keith Parks has written for and been commissioned by Duo XXI, Charlotte Civic Orchestra, Out of Bounds Ensemble, NeXT Ens, Force of Nature, SC Music Teachers Association, NC School of the Arts Symphony, the International Music Program, and many others. His compositions have been performed in numerous venues throughout North and South America, Europe, Australia, and Asia. His research into computer music techniques has been widely disseminated. He was awarded the Aaron Copland Award and his music is available on the EMF, Vox Novus, and ERM labels. He is currently Professor of Music at Winthrop University. His scores and more information are available at ronparksmusic.com.

Tomoko Deguchi started her performing career in Japan, specializing in contemporary music. She has been a soloist and featured performer at numerous concerts including the 20th-Century Piano Music series, the Young Artist Concert series, Kobe Art Conference Competition concert, and the Buffalo Contemporary Ensemble Concert series. She was selected one of the six finalists in the Crane Festival of New Music, National Student Performers Competition. She was the 1998 Concerto Competition winner at the University of Wyoming. In the same year, she was invited as a guest performer at the Northern Illinois University, where she did a recording for her first solo piano album Syncopated Lady, featuring works of members of the American Composers Forum (1999, Capstone Records). Her recording is included in the Music of Laurel Firant (2006, Capstone Records). She continues to perform in composer's conferences and new music concerts. In 2008, she founded a new music ensemble, Out of Bounds, which she performs with other featured professional performers from the Charlotte region.

Emily Nance is currently a sophomore at Transylvania University. She is a Computer Science major and planning to participate in the Pre-Engineering program. She absolutely loves music, playing piano since kindergarten, and participated in band all throughout middle and high school and into college. Before coming to Transylvania, she had composed a couple of piano pieces. Utilizing the technology provided on campus and drawing on her experiences in the Intro to Music Technology class, she continued to compose many other pieces, with more than just a piano as an instrument. She views composing music as a wonderful experience.

Things that Go Bump in the Night was composed last year as a project for the Intro to Music Technology class at Transylvania University. I had a lot of fun going around campus with a recorder capturing different sounds. My partner and I explored the scary elevator in Old Morrison, the creaking doors in the Mitchell Fine Arts Building, and loud air conditioning systems. We also experimented with keys dragging along the ground, the sound of footsteps running down the hallway, and putting different effects on my piano playing. The mixing and editing of these sounds is what made the music what you hear now.

Composer Kyle Shaw writes colorful, energetic music, in acoustic and electro-acoustic mediums, tailored to the people and circumstances of their occasions and informed by his experiences as a performing artist. He has been a finalist for the ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer Award, a Belvedere Chamber Music Festival Composition prize winner, and 1st-prize winner of the Iowa State University Carillon Composition Competition and the Vera Hinckley Mayhew Creative Arts Contest. He is a recipient of a Barlow Endowment commission, the 17th-annual 21st-Century Piano commission, and has been a resident fellow at the Osage Arts Community’s Mid-Missouri Composers Symposium. He earned a BM from Brigham Young University and is currently pursuing his DMA at the University of Illinois, where he has studied composition with Carlos Carrillo, Stephen Taylor, Heinrich Taube, Reynold Tharp, and electroacoustic music with Scott Wyatt and Eli Fieldsteel. He lives in Savoy, IL with his wife Tess and three daughters. Kyleshawmusic.weebly.com

Modern percussionist Victor Pons "stretches the bounds of electronics and vibraphone" -ArtsATL. He is dedicated to advancing new music in confluence with today’s technological trends. The Goat Farm Arts Center describes him as being “amongst the radicals reshaping musical parameters.” Victor received his Bachelors in Music performance from the University of South Florida and both his Masters in Music performance and Artist Certificate from Georgia State University. He is a DMA candidate at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Currently he teaches at Georgia State University as an Instructor of Percussion and teaches computer applications in music.

The Greek "topos" (literally "place") is the root word for "topic," "topology," and "topography." According to topic theorists, a musical topic is an archetypical narrative or style (e.g. "alla Turca" or "Sturm und Drang"). A more recent trend in contemporary music theory is to borrow from mathematics elements of the subdiscipline of topology, comparing harmony and voice leading to geometrical entities which contort and permute in fascinating ways. The study of topography is obviously concerned with layouts of physical surfaces. The three areas of study intersected in my thinking which went into this piece: how can I write a piece for vibraphone and electronics (using the rhetorical devices and other electroacoustic "topics" I've imbibed over the last few years), which is harmonically (or "topologically") colorful and interesting, which is at the same time ergonomically pleasing to the performer (i.e. it lies well on the "topography" of the vibraphone)? This piece is the result of my inquiries.

Maurice Wright’s music has been performed by Philadelphia Orchestra, the Boston Symphony Orchestra, and the Emerson String Quartet. His visual music and electroacoustic music compositions have been performed on five continents. The American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Guggenheim Foundation, the Fromm Music Foundation, the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, the Independence Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts have recognized and supported his work. Recordings of his work appear on New World, Innova, Equilibrium, everglade, CRI, and other labels. His compositions are published by APNM, Theodore Presser, Schott, and by the composer. He is Laura H. Carnell Professor of Music Studies at Temple University’s Boyer College Of Music and Dance.

The importance of the (water) well is illustrated by its homographic equivalent, which means "in good health." The well was the center of a community in ancient times, and to poison a well was to destroy it. Such was the practice of an attacked army prior to an invasion. In the United States, many states consider well poisoning a capital crime, along with murder and rape. This little piece plays on images of molecules, pipes, bubbles, and blobs, and on themes of health and violence. As to technologies used, for fixed media audio, I usually use Csound. For more interactive pieces, I've used PureData (pd). My music is very "note-based" rather than "mixer made." I create images using POVRAY, a raytracing software program that makes sequences of single frames, which I combine in QuickTime.

Raised in Hong Kong, composer Chin Ting (Patrick) Chan is Assistant Professor of Music Composition at Ball State University. His music has been featured throughout the North and South Americas, Europe and Asia; at festivals such as the International Rostrum of Composers, IRCAM’s ManiFeste, the ISCM World Music Days Festival, June in Buffalo and the Wellesley Composers Conference, among many others. He holds a D.M.A. from the University of Missouri–Kansas City as well as degrees from Bowling Green State University and San José State University.

"tempora mutantur” is a Latin phrase meaning “the times are changed.” It is usually stated in a hexametric form, followed by another phrase “nos et mutamur in illis,” meaning “we too are changed in them.” This piece is one in a series of electroacoustic pieces relating to the motion of time and its effects on sounds. Aside from working primarily with time-based DSP effects, the idea of the motion of time is also prominent in how the composer systematically structured the composition in its harmonic content as well as its overall pace.

Dr. Andrea Cheeseman is Professor of Clarinet at Appalachian State University. A versatile performer, Cheeseman appears regularly as a soloist and collaborative musician. An advocate of new music, she has received invitations to perform at diverse festivals such as the Electroacoustic Barn Dance, SEAMUS, Third Practice and National Flute Association Conventions. Cheeseman earned the Doctorate of Musical Arts and Master of Music degrees in clarinet performance from Michigan State University and the Bachelor of Music degrees in clarinet performance and music education from Ithaca College. When not teaching or performing, Cheeseman spends her time gardening, swimming and practicing ashtanga yoga.

Dave Abbott is the owner of Maxing Out Media and the driving creative force behind the music of Too Many Drummers. His eclectic body of work is a reflection of Dave’s international background: He was born in Puerto Rico, lived in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia for 12 years, then sailed the Pacific Ocean with his family throughout his teen years before coming to America for college. After graduation, Dave sailed from Australia to the USA, completing an 11 year circumnavigation. In 2009 he released a 74 minute feature film, “The Red Sea Chronicles”, documenting his family’s journey across the Indian Ocean and up the Red Sea. Dave lives in Lexington, KY with his wife and two daughters.

Shylo Shepherd is a designer and educator. Her education is in architectural design, and she has 9 years of professional experience. She has a passion for helping others learn and grow, and has worked at doing so both as a volunteer as well as an adjunct instructor in the past. HVRE has given Shylo the opportunity to design projects to help people in the community learn VR development, get public exposure, and see a project through to completion, including publication. Every time Shylo and HVRE meets she learns something about this process as well, and hopes to continue creating more educational content from the experience she is having with HVRE. Every member in HVRE makes her so proud of their progress and passion.

Larry Barnes is currently professor of music and Bingham Fellow for Excellence in Teaching at Transylvania University. He is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Composer Fellowship, two Kentucky Arts Council awards, an Al Smith Fellowship, two Lexington Arts Council grants, and 31 ASCAP Awards. Barnes has fulfilled over thirty commissions, including being twice named the Kentucky Music Teachers’ Association’s commissioned composer. His Toccata-Act of War, premiered by colleague Gregory Partain, was selected by the Society of Composers, Inc. for a concert tour and recording on Capstone Records. In 2008 he composed the original score for the film Euphoria, which took the Gold Award for Documentary at the Houston Film Festival. His Morning Gigue was recorded by the Slovak Radio Symphony. His Rain Songs, named “one of the truly great works for flute and harp,” is released by Alry Publications in print. Hear Barnes’s Rain Songs as well as numerous other original works at https://soundcloud.com/larry-barnes-608234425. You may reach the composer at lbarnes@transy.edu

Max does Tai Chi 24 combines two strong interests of mine. Tai Chi slows the aggressive moves of Kung Fu to a meditative pace, with controlled deep breathing coordinated with leg movement, and hand movements reproducing fast attack moves, but at a slow, careful pace. Tai Chi 24 is the first form students learn – an abbreviated version of the classical 64 form, lasting about eight minutes. I earned a first-degree black belt in Tai Chi from grandmaster Sin The in 2012, and I continue to work toward second degree. In a computer music coding seminar in Charlotte, North Carolina in June 2016, I began coding in Max to create a simple program that employs two digital mapping cameras, one for each hand. Once mapped, performers can proceed with the form at their own pace. With a fixed range of values to follow, different for each hand, the program tracks the hand movements to create two melodies that follow their own directions and speeds, and increase volume as they approach the cameras. This guarantees each performance will be unique, thus keeping the performer in the present moment with little surprises here and there, but with a continuous drone that maintains a meditative mindset.

  3:30 - 4:00 p.m.— Reception for Studio 300 Musicians and Artists                                                       — In Morlan Gallery

    Fri.. Oct 6.           Transylvania students, faculty, & public are invited (snacks & drinks provided!)  Mitchell Fine Arts Center (MFA)

  7:30 - 9:00 p.m. — WAVE 3 Concert: featuring surround sound, electro-acoustic                             — In Haggin Auditorium

   Fri. Oct 6.              performance, interactive music, and videomusic                                                    Mitchell Fine Arts Center (MFA)

  10 - 11:30 p.m. — WAVE 2 Concert: Late Night with Digital Al, Interactive Electronica & Club Music  — At Al's Bar

    Thurs. Oct 5.                                                                                                                                                (Two Blocks North of MFA,

                                                                                                                                                                         corner of E 6th & N Limestone)